How Much Down Payment Should You Put On A House

Down payments are often, but not always, part of a loan. When you see "zero down" offers, no down payment is required. However, it is sometimes wise to make a down payment even when you don’t have to. The down payment often covers a meaningful percentage of the total purchase price (such as 20 percent).

For decades, it was one of the few hard-and-fast rules when purchasing a home: Put 20% down. A hefty down payment would help you build up equity faster, and make sure your mortgage was affordable.

The more you put down, the less you need to finance and pay mortgage insurance on, and the smaller your monthly mortgage payment will be. But in case you haven’t heard, the traditional 20 percent is no longer the norm. According to Down Payment Resource, the median down payment for first-time homebuyers in 2016 was just 4 percent.

The biggest obstacle to buying a house for most homebuyers is the down payment. Many borrowers don’t have the conventional 20% down payment. However, today there are many types of home loans that offer low and no down payment options. In this article we will be talking about how much you should to put down on a house for each mortgage type.

A down payment on a home is a big action step to ensure you get the house you want, and the mortgage loan you want. Find out whether you need to follow the 20% percent rule or if you can get away.

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So, if you borrowed $270,000 on a $300,000 home — in other words, your down payment came to 10% — your LTV ratio (that is, the loan amount, $270,000, divided by the price of the house, $300,000.

Get up to 5 Offers at LendingTree.com to see how much you can afford. Reader question: "We are planning to buy a house in the 250k dollar range. How much earnest money should we pay for a home purchase in this price range? Does it vary based on the price of the house, or is it pretty standard.